Tudor Dialect Exercises

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MALE:

Ah, my princess! My dove! Come hither, that I may kiss thy rapturous lips! 

FEMALE:

My lord! Do keep thy voice low, ere someone overhear thee and spread rumours.

MALE:

Keep quiet, sayest thou? I am enamoured of thee, my love! How may I keep still the motions of my heart?

FEMALE:

Oh, still not thy heart, my swain, but still thy tongue until we are in close.

MALE:

Fie! I care not what man or woman may hear! Beloved, I do beseech thee to shine as my betrothed!

FEMALE:

My lord, I am o'ercome! Speak not of marriage!

MALE:

What, dost thou love me not?

FEMALE:

Nay, I do love thee, but thou must not speak of such privy matters but of doors. 

MALE:

Mouse, let me but speak of thine eyes, then. Like liquid sapphire are thy shining eyes, which, by their magic, seek to drown my heart. The welkin in her bravest midnight glory hath not such deepness as thine amourous eyes.

FEMALE:

Oh, my dearest, thou speakest terribly! But 'tis not meet that thou shouldst so loudly profess thy love.

MALE:

Ah, be not a blushet, my dove! Let all the world know how far I am in love! I daresay that the earth shall quake with her own resounding sighs to hear me tell it!

FEMALE:

Thou art overzealous, my love, and overhot, to be in public. Prithee, let's away and thou mayest ease my chill with thy rising warmth!

MALE:

Oh ho, my pretty little wench! I am for it! Wherefore do we tarry?


Vocabulary Used:

Tudor Word

Modern Translation

I am enamoured of thee

I love you

Swain

Lover

In close

In private

Privy

Private

Bravest

Most splendid

Welkin

Sky

Meet

Proper

Blushet

Shy maiden

Mouse

Term of endearment

Thou speakest terribly

You have a dirty mouth


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