Tudor Dialect Exercises

You are viewing Exercise 7 of 13:

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FEMALE 1:

Good den, mistress! Oh, what hast thou got there, grapes? Harry! They do look delicious!

FEMALE 2:

Good morrow, Madam, and well met! I see thou hast a keen eye for pleasant fruits. Here, prithee, taste of these. My husband brought them, lately, from France.

FEMALE 1:

Grammercies. gentle madam. but I have not the pence to spare.

FEMALE 2:

Fie, fret not! Taste of these. I'll not hold thee to a purchase. Fall to, mistress, and tell me that be not the veriest height a grape may touch!

FEMALE 1:

Marry! An I be not a cursen woman, I've ne'er tasted sweeter grape! Fie! I am a very poor woman, but I fain would have these grapes. Oh, I beseech thee, madam, in all good sadness, accept of these few pence for a handful of heaven!

FEMALE 2:

Well, since though art an honest woman, I will not stand with thee. Take thee a handful and a half, an thou wouldst. 'Tis a pleasure to serve thee. in sooth.

FEMALE 1:

Oh, joyful day! I thank thee. madam, in earnest!

FEMALE 2:

Fare thee well, good mistress! Enjoy thy grapes!

FEMALE 1:

Verily, I shall indeed! Anon!


Vocabulary Used:

Tudor Word

Modern Translation

Good den, good morrow, well met

Familiar greetings

An

If

Prithee

I pray thee, or please

Fall to

Start eating

Veriest

Utmost or greatest

Cursen

Christian

Grammercies

"Grand Mercies", many thanks

Accept

To take

Marry

Indeed (a mild oath, from "By the Virgin Mary")

Fain would

would like to

Good Sadness

Seriousness

Stand with thee

Haggle with you

Fret not

Do not worry

Anon

See you later


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