Tudor Dialect Exercises

You are viewing Exercise 11 of 13:

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MALE:

Oh, alas! Woe, and misery!

FEMALE:

What ailest thee, good master?

MALE:

Oh, milady, I am melancholic. I fear me I am filled with bad humours.

FEMALE:

Hayhap thou art in need of a physic, then. Tarry not, and get thee to a leech!

MALE:

A leech! Madam, no leech can cure mine ailment. Nay. I am poisoned, poisoned by the venom of love.

FEMALE:

Love, paugh! A plague on it! 'Tis nothing that a rouse
with Rhenish wine could not cure.

MALE:

Rhenish wine? 'Fai th, I am never able to endure such torment! Why, I were as good to drink mithridate, and have no cause to fret about next morn!

FEMALE:

What, I have heard it said that if a man be drunk overnight, the devil cannot hurt him in the morning, and there be nothing in the world better to get a man drunk than Rhenish wine, I can tell thee!

MALE:

Aye, and nothing in the world be better to make a man sick! I'll none of it, I warrant thee.

FEMALE:

Fie, the devil take thee for a dunce, then! There he no ailment that Rhenish wine cannot cure.


Vocabulary Used:

Tudor Word

Modern Translation

Melancholic

Depressed

Mayhap

Perhaps

Physic

Doctor

Bad Humors

Illnesses

Mithridate

A poison

Tarry

Wait

Leech

Can mean both the doctor and the cure
(i.e. bloodletter and bloodletting, respectively)

Rouse

Bout, Round (of liquor)

'Faith

"In Faith" (a mild oath)

I can tell thee

For sure, or certainly


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