Tudor Dialect Exercises

You are viewing Exercise 3 of 13:

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MALE:

Good my lady, I have heard it said that thou dost possess a beauteous singing voice. Do tell me, my lady, how such a lowly varlet as myself may come by such a voice. 

FEMALE:

Oh, my lord, a pleasant voice is not to be had by mere learning. 'Tis a talent; one must needs be born with it.

MALE:

(He slumps) A talent, sayest thou? Why, then, be there no hope for me?

FEMALE:

Nay, good sir, I meant only that one cannot learn a beauteous voice. I cannot teach thee that, but I ~ teach thee to sing better.

MALE:

Wondrous! By your leave, madam, do teach me!

FEMALE:

To begin, sir, thou must learn to breathe correctly. Draw in thy breath, deeply.

MALE:

Like so?

FEMALE:

Aye, 'tis well. Now, thou must use this breath to propel thy voice, and sing as though thy voice box were in thy belly.

MALE:

How now, in my belly?

FEMALE:

Aye, in thy belly. I dare say I am in for a shrewd labour , but I shall make a better singer of thee, yet.

MALE:

Oh, my lady, 'tis no use! I fear I am destined to remain a most heinous bellower.

FEMALE:

Marry, sir! Be not so glum, Come, let's away to my house and I shall prove thee wrong!


Vocabulary Used:

Tudor Word

Modern Translation

Varlet

Knave (an insulting term)

Glum

Gloomy

'Tis Well

That's Good

Shrewd

Hard or Bad


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