Tudor Dialect Exercises

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MALE:

Good day, my lady! I am in need of a stoup of ale, this day. Canst thou direct me to a fair pub?

FEMALE:

A pub , sir? Fie, the pubs are harsh, in this village. But wherefore dost thou ask this of me? Do I appear a common wench?

MALE:

Nay, nay, my lady! I meant no offence to thee. I am but stricken with a fearsome thirst, and only ask of thee where I might obtain some comforting spirits.

FEMALE:

Ah, since thou dost ask this of me, kindly, hie thee to the High street, and thou shalt find an inn at the sign of the eagle. I warrant thee, thou shalt not find a sterner cup of ale in all the land.

MALE:

Grammercies, gently lady. I am forever in thy debt. By thy leave, wouldst thou retire with me to this fine inn and grace me with thy radiant presence...

FEMALE:

Marry, sir, thou art too bold! But, peradventure I will join thee, an thou canst prove thyself a gentleman.

MALE:

A gentleman. eh? Why, I'll prove myself such a gentleman as thou hast ne'er seen in thy life. or at least. I shall have fun in the attempting of it, I can tell thee!

FEMALE:

Let's away, then, for I am in need of such a merriment!


Vocabulary Used:

Tudor Word

Modern Translation

Stoup

A Goblet or a cup

Fair

Good

Merriment

Entertainment

An

If

Wherefore

Why

Hie

Go

Grammercies

"Grand Mercies", many thanks

By thy leave

Please, if you will

Marry

Indeed (a mild oath, from "By the Virgin Mary")

Peradventure

perhaps, maybe


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