Tudor Dialect Exercises

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MAN:

What ho, good master! I am in search of one known as the Rhyming Wizard. Canst thou aid me in mine endeavor?

WIZARD:

I must confess, I look a mess, and ale has made me weak, But judge me not. I am no sot, but I am who you seek.

MAN:

Wondrous! Good mage, I prithee, I am in dire need of some verse.

WIZARD:

Ah, verse, indeed! What kind dost need? My repertoire's not shallow. A melody to comfort thee, or a tune to turn men sallow'! A song so sweet, a number neat, a madrigal most mellow? Or wouldst desire a tune for lyre? What lack you, pretty fellow?

MAN:

I need soft verse to win my lady fair. Look here, good sir, that is her standing there.

WIZARD:

My, is she fair! What lustrous hair! Ah, this will be a labour. For sweet romance, pay in advance. 'Tis fifteen pence, good neighbor!

MAN:

Fie! Fifteen pence! Thou trojan! Hence! Thou whoreson, cozening scab! She is no common drab!

WIZARD:

Why verily, that I can see. Good sir, I'm quite sincere. Her looks inspire, so don't inquire wherefore why she be so dear!

MAN:

I'll pay thy share, for she is fair. She makes me feel like sighing. But by my troth! Thou monstrous rogue! Thou'st got me versifying!

WIZARD:

What sayest thou? Oh, 'sblood, hov . now! Thy rhyming makes me sure! For the rhymes I've spurred, pay by the word, and give me five groats more!


Vocabulary Used:

Tudor Word

Modern Translation

What Ho

A Greeting

Mage

Magician

I Prithee

I pray thee, please

What lack you?

What do you need?

Trojan

Thief

Hence

Go away

Whoreson, Scab, Rogue

Insults of a person's character

Cozening

Conning

Drab

Whore

Verily

Truly

By my troth

I swear

Wherefore

Why

Share

Price of something

Dear

Expensive

'Sblood

By God's Blood (an oath)

Thou'st

Thou hast

Groat

Nickels


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