A Guide to Commonly
used Tudor Phrases

 

The first word listed is the modern English phrase,
 followed by it's Tudor Era translation:

 

EATING AND DRINKING, ETC.

Stay and eat with us.

Tarry and dine/sup/feast with us.

Your food is great!

Thy victuals are delicious!

I'm hungry.

I am hungered.

I'm thirsty.

I am parched:""

What are those things?

What be these?

What are they made of?

Of what do they consist?

SHOPPING

This is too expensive

This be too dear.

Please wait on me.

Prithee, attend me.

Cents, pennies.

Pence or "p."

Ten dollars

One Crown.

Five dollars.

Half a Crown

One dollar

One Schilling. Punt

How much is it?

How many pence is't?

CLOTHING

Your clothes are beautiful

Thy raiment is beauteous.

My clothes are dirty

My garb be soiled.

Look at his cape.

Regard his cloak/mantle.

ENTERTAINMENT

Listen to our song

Harken to our tune.

Begin the game.

Abroach the gaming.

We will dance for yOu.

Gentles, we shall dance for thee.

Watch these sad and funny plays.

Attend to these tragical and mirthful playlets.

I tell stories allover the world

I speak tales from here to yon

The show begins at one.

The performance/play commences on the stroke/hour of one.

The winner shall get the reward.

Who wins shall receive rewarding/meed.

We entertain for your pleasure.

We dissemble for thy humour.

Please watch these magic tricks.

Pray regard these stints of magic.

Don't be afraid to play.

Fling caution to yonder winds.

You ain't seen nothing yet.

Verily hast thou witnessed naught until this moment.

Please sit down.

Pray sit ye down.

It seems to be going well.

It bodes/augers well.

Can I help you?

How mayest I be of service to thee?

It was good doing business with you

It hath been a pleasure to serve thee.

Please have a sense of humor.

I prithee keep thy good humor.

The first aid doctor is over there

The physic is yonder.

COURTSHIP

I am in love with you.

I am enamoured of thee.

Let's have a roll in the hay.

Favor us with a tumble/shake.

will you marry me?

Wilt thou favor me with thy hand?

Are you with someone else?

Art thou enjoined to another?

Keep your virginity.

Preserve thy maidenhood.

lie is a cad.

He is an errant clown/rake.

When will you come back?

When shalt thou return?

Am I going to see you tomorrow?

Shall I see thee on the morrow?

Will you be my love?

Wilt thou shine as my beloved?

Where are the bathrooms?

Where be the privies?

The bathrooms are over there

The privies be yon.

POLITE PHRASES

If you don't mind.

By your leave

What do you say

What sayest thou?

It's not right/appropriate

'Tis not meet.

That's fine/good

'Tis well/fair.

What would you like?

What's your pleasure/fancy? (or What be thy pleasure/fancy?

I'm sorry

I'm vexed.

I swear it is the truth

By my troth.

Can I help you?

May I be of service to thee?

Would you do me a favor?

Wouldst thou grant me thy favor?

MEETINGS AND GREETINGS

Hello, nice to see you.

Good day, well met! Hail and well met! Good morrow to thee!

How are you?

How farest thou?/How dost thou?

How do you do, good friend?

Greetings (Hail), cousin!

Fine thanks and you?

I fare well, thank thee. How dost thou?

What is your name?

What be thy title? What be thy name? What art thou called?

My name is

My title is, My name is, I am called

Where are you from?

From whence hail ye? Where hail ye from?

Where are you going?

Wither goest thou?

Welcome to

Welcome to the village of ...

How old are you?

What be the number of thy years? What be thy nonage?

I can't tell you

I am not at liberty to say.

What's the matter?

What ails thee?

See you later.

I shall (will) see thee anon.

Goodbye

Fare thee well. Good morrow. God ye good'den.

Will you wait for me?

Wilt thou attend me?

TIME AND PLACE

What time is it?

How stands the hour?

It is noon.

'Tis midday.

It is 4:30

'Tis twixt 4 & 5. 'Tis half past 4.

You're late

Thou art behind the hour.

It's near evening.

'Tis nigh to twilight.

It will occur soon.

The time draws nigh.

HOW TO USE "LET"

  • I would I knew his mind.

  • I would you might tarry.

  • I would my coins were many.

  • Here is a woman would speak with thee.

DIFFERENT USES OF LET

  • Let: Let you be merry.

  • Let him approach.

  • Let not this knave escape.

  • Let thee get thee hence.

Well:

You were well to remain silent

Right:

Right glad I am thou art here.

Stay:

Sir, stay your sword.

Click on the Piece of Eight to return to the Main Page